Anna Marie Pyle

Anna Marie Pyle's picture
William Edward Gilbert Prof of Molecular, Cellular & Developmental Biology; Investigator Howard Hughes Med Inst; Prof Chemistry
219 Prospect St, New Haven, CT 06511-2106

Biographical Information:Anna Marie Pyle is the William Edward Gilbert Professor of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology and Professor of Chemistry at Yale University. She has been a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator since 1997. Dr. Pyle obtained her undergraduate degree in Chemistry from Princeton University and received her Ph.D. in Chemistry from Columbia University in 1990. During her graduate work with Professor Jacqueline K. Barton, Dr. Pyle developed transition-metal complexes for recognizing DNA microstructures and initiating site-specific redox chemistry. Dr. Pyle was a postdoctoral fellow in the laboratory of Thomas Cech, where she began her studies on molecular recognition of RNA. Specifically, she investigated the role of 2’-hydroxyl groups in the stabilization of RNA tertiary structure. Dr. Pyle formed her own research group in 1992 in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics at Columbia University Medical Center. In 2002, she moved to Yale University, where she leads a research group that specializes in structure and function of large RNA molecules and RNA remodeling enzymes. Dr. Pyle teaches the undergraduate Molecular Biology course at Yale, where she also leads initiatives to rebuild basic science infrastructure. Dr. Pyle is the Chair of the MSFA Study Section at the NIH, and she previously served as a permanent member on the MSFE, and MGB Study Sections. At Brookhaven National labs, she serves on the Science and Technology Steering Committee and on Beamline Advisory Teams at the NSLSII light source. Dr. Pyle has organized numerous meetings, including Gordon Conferences, FASEB, Keystone and Telluride Meetings. She is the Co-Editor of Methods in Enzymology and serves on the Editorial Board of the Journal of Molecular Biology. Dr. Pyle is the author of over 150 publications. The Pyle laboratory uses a diverse set of biochemical and biophysical techniques, including crystallography and chemical probing, to understand the structural complexity of RNA architecture. She pioneered the study of RNA helicase enzymes and other RNA-stimulated ATPases that serve as translocases, RNA remodeling enzymes, folding cofactors and signaling enzymes in the cell. Her experimental work is complemented by efforts to develop new computational tools for modeling, analyzing and predicting RNA structure.

Read Anna’s CV